Violence and police: Ambivalences of the domestic monopoly of force

Violence is one of the highly controversial issues in contemporary society because it is both entertaining and repulsive. Violence is also highly ambivalent as a phenomenon.

 

 Learn to use violence

Harming other people is just as much a part of police work as protecting against injury within the framework of the social mandate of comprehensive livelihood security, because at the level of action, the protection of one human right even businesses such as http://www.masa7.com/شركة-نقل-عفش-بجدة/is often linked to the interference with another. In order to be able to work successfully, police officers must therefore be made capable of violence in their training without slipping into an affinity for violence.

Police culture: avoid violence

In the official police culture – a culture of legality and procedural form – violence only plays a marginal role. This has been especially true since the efforts of the police towards a “police model” at the end of the 1980s, when a policy of smart policing began, in the course of which the service orientation shaped the image of the police more and more.

 

Police culture: living with violence

The everyday police culture is a culture of the so-called manual police officers, i.e. those who still actually lend a hand to people. Many of these officers, especially the younger ones and those in closed units of the riot police, respond aggressively to the opposing side’s aggressive relationship arrangements with a certain anticipation.

 

 Violence against the police

The basic condition for the development of the democratic state monopoly on the use of force includes that the police also have the task of inciting violence.
Police officers are very sensitive to the violence inflicted on them. They are not so much shocked by the actual violence, but by the fact that the alleged disrespect towards them is taken for granted and how widespread they are – the police, often synonymous with the state, the authorities.

Police misuse of force

The same applies to the question of whether the legitimate and illegitimate use of violence by police officers has increased qualitatively and quantitatively, or whether this impression can be traced back to stronger media coverage in today’s violence-sensitive society, where violence is violent where it occasionally occurs again triggers reactions and fears.

Continue reading